Planting Trees

For the month of August, when you purchase any wood product, we will plant a tree in your name in northern British Columbia. The province has established itself as a leader in forest management, implementing stringent forest policies, stewardship programs, and scientific research.

Forests cover two-thirds of B.C. – totalling almost 60 million hectares. In recent years, insect pests and diseases have decimated many of these areas. The dead trees become fuel for wildfires, and in the summer of 2017, we experienced the worst wildfire in our history, with over 1.2 million hectares burned. Our reforestation partners are experts in rehabilitating B.C. forests and ensuring they have a sustainable future.

We are currently exploring the many qualities and beauty of wood. Visit us in-store or check out our blog to learn more about how amazing this material really is.

Japan Handmade 2019

 

On June 6th, we welcomed the return of the Japanese Master Craftsmen, Takahiro Yagi of Kaikado (Metal Tea Caddies), Shuji Nakagawa of Nakagawa Mokkougei (Wooden Vessels), Toru Tsuji of Kanaami-Tsuji (Wire Weaving), and Kenya Imanishi of Kagizen Yoshifusa (Confectionary) to speak about their craft and family legacies.

Holiday Gift Guide No. 6

We’ve all been there… the holidays sneak up on you and suddenly you realize not everyone on your list has been crossed off! Be it for a teacher, hostess or family member, we are here to help with this list of great last minute in-stock gifts and stocking stuffers.

If you are in Vancouver or the surrounding area, place your order for any in-stock accessory by Thursday the 21st and we’ll guarantee that you’ll have it by the end of the week with optional gift wrapping. All online orders over $100 receive free shipping.

 

Continue reading “Holiday Gift Guide No. 6”

Photographer Selwyn Pullan

 

Photographer Selwyn Pullan captured the spirit of modernism on the West Coast

Celebrated photographer and North Shore resident Selwyn Pullan died on Monday, September 25, 2017. Born in Vancouver on March 14, 1922, Pullan studied photography at the Art Center School in Los Angeles (now the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena) from 1948 to 1950. His iconic images of West Coast Modern architecture captured the spirit of innovation and design in British Columbia from the 1950s to the 70s. Pullan’s photographic projects by many leading architects, including Barry Downs, Arthur Erickson, Fred Hollingsworth, Ned Pratt and Ron Thom, were prominently featured in lifestyle magazines of the era.

Selwyn Pullan’s compelling photographs were the subject of two solo exhibitions and the seminal book Selwyn Pullan Photographing Mid-Century West Coast Modernism (Douglas & McIntyre 2012), produced by the West Vancouver Museum. In 2014, Pullan generously donated his important archive of more than 10,000 negatives and prints to the museum.

“I saw Selwyn’s photographs at his studio for the first time in 2004. I kept visiting him to learn about the development of modernism in this city. His images brilliantly showcased modern living on the West Coast and the pioneering architectural designs that played an important role in the city’s growth,” says Kiriko Watanabe, Assistant Curator, who worked closely with Pullan on both exhibitions and the monograph.

“We are fortunate that Selwyn chose to donate his collection to the West Vancouver Museum. It is a lasting and historically important record of a bygone era. We will honour Selwyn’s monumental achievements by making the collection accessible over time,” says Darrin Morrison, Administrator/Curator.

The West Vancouver Museum will honour Selwyn Pullan’s legacy with an exhibition of his work in 2018.

Image: Selwyn Pullan in his studio. Photograph by Ken Dyck, 2008.

 

This post was written by the West Vancouver Museum.

Rest in Peace Robert Burgers

Robert and Marieke Burgers have been clients since the mid 1960’s. At that time Niels remembers a young vibrant Dutch couple, full of optimism.

Robert taught us and our design community so much. He was a huge personality, generous, warm and he didn’t suffer fools gladly. A perfectionist, he always was pushing and pressing for better.

His family was his centre and he taught us to treasure that family time above all else.

The first time that I was at the Burgers home, I noticed that they didn’t take the Artemide tags off the Tolomeo lights. Why? It just was that way.

The homes that he designed are big hearted, open and inviting; Marieke’s interior design complemented that with striking colours and brave forms; his gardens are sumptuous and elegant always with room to play bocce or lay out a long table for 20.

There was nothing better than being invited to the Burgers, with Marieke’s delicious cooking and Robert laughing a big belly laugh. Lively discussions and contrasting views were always in order. Sometimes we felt so lucky to be nestled in the luscious garden with an intimate table for four or with many other close friends gathered around the long table in the garden.

We will miss him and will honour his belief to never settle for less than the best.

– Nancy